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4 Tips for Achieving Financial Freedom from the Experts at The National Bank of Indianapolis

We asked Beth W. McIntire, Jill H. Robisch, Kerry A. Ritzler, and Melissa R. Oliver from The National Bank of Indianapolis for their best money-saving tips.
Featured Image Financial Freedom The First Bank of Indianapolis

The National Bank of Indianapolis LogoIf you’re looking for smart ways to save money and invest in your long-term future, these four tips, all from women executives at The National Bank of Indianapolis, will help set you on the path to financial freedom.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
a photo of jill robisch from the national bank of Indianapolis smiling with teeth wearing a black blouse in front of a white background
Jill H. Robisch

JILL H. ROBISCH

VICE PRESIDENT & SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, NONPROFIT SERVICES

“Spending for value means knowing when someone other than you is best positioned to take on a task. While we might be paid salaries, knowing your hourly rate can be a helpful benchmark for understanding when you might be better off paying someone else to do a task. Time is money!”

a photo of Melissa Oliver from the national bank of Indianapolis smiling with teeth wearing a bright red coat
Melissa R. Oliver

MELISSA R. OLIVER

VICE PRESIDENT & INVESTMENT OFFICER, EMERGING INVESTOR MARKET

“Think of building wealth as a monthly debt obligation. You pay yourself first (ideally saving 10%-20% of income) and then you spend what’s left.”

a photo of Kerry Ritzler from the national bank of Indianapolis smiling wearing a grey blazer in front of a white background
Kerry A. Ritzler

KERRY A. RITZLER

Vice president, private banking

“Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Surround yourself with a team of experts you can trust.”

a photo of Beth McIntire from the national bank of Indianapolis smiling with teeth wearing a fuchsia blouse
Beth W. McIntire

BETH W. MCINTIRE

VICE PRESIDENT & SENIOR FIDUCIARY OFFICER/MANAGER, TRUST LEGAL, TAX & ESTATES

“All adults, no matter their age, need estate planning documents that should be reviewed and revised as life changes. With these documents, you retain control by providing instructions about what happens when you aren’t able to act for yourself and by designating who will act for you in the event of illness or incapacity and at death.”

RELATED: 6 SMART WAYS TO SAVE MONEY ON SALON APPOINTMENTS

Stephanie Groves is the Executive Editor of Indy Maven.

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